Passionflower (Maypop)

Passiflora incarnata, known as Maypop or Passionflower vine, is an extremely prolific native perennial vine that bears gorgeous flowers from early summer into the fall and a light flavorful fruit beginning in September. It has a tremendously tropical look to it, being the most cold hardy of the Passiflora genus, and offers a wonderful aesthetic to any garden. Especially when trellised on a pergola or arbor, this plant will draw lots of attention from anyone who sees it.

 

The leaves are edible as a salad addition or cooked green and have a delightful nutty flavor. However, some caution should be exercised, and i would advise against consuming large quantities as the leaves are reputed to have a mild sedative effect, and may inhibit the production of monoamine oxidase (so do not consume with fermented vegetables, cheeses and other foods high in tyramine, or certain prescription drugs). The real treat from these friends however, is definitely the light airy fruits that burst with flavor! They don't have much much density to them so it takes quite a few to really get the flavor but they make an excellent addition to sodas, kombucha, and other homemade fermented beverages.

 

These very same qualities make them an excellent herbal ally for those who struggle with falling asleep, or evening anxiousness! 

 

Be sure to give these vines plenty of room to climb, because climb they will!! Cultivation of these native vines is easy...maybe a little too easy! After a few years they can reach heights of 50’ or more and completely cover the side of a home or barn. Also be sure to plant them in “islands” where they can be contained from running on all sides, either by a lawn mower, or an impervious barrier (ie plant box, concrete driveway, home foundation, etc). That being said they are absolutely stunning in their beauty and they attract a wide range of native pollinators, butterflies, and even hummingbirds. 4-6" Bare Root.

 

Pre-order now for pick up Spring 2021!

Passionflower (Maypop)

$10.00Price
Number of Plants